Sudan coup protesters defy tear gas, death toll rises to five

Sudanese security forces used tear gas to disperse hundreds of demonstrators in the capital Khartoum and its outskirts on Saturday. Demonstrators were protesting the October 25 coup attempt. According to the physicians’ syndicate, the death toll has now increased to five.

The protesters who favor a civilian administration wanted to demonstrate that they are still heard. They had to mobilize by text messaging or graffiti on walls since the internet was down for three weeks. For its part, the military regime had to exercise caution in order to convince the world community, which had denounced the coup.

Security officers shot tear gas canisters at hundreds of protestors in Omdurman, a northeastern neighborhood isolated from Khartoum by a Nile bridge, as is customary during Sudanese rallies. To halt protests, security authorities built barriers throughout the capital and suburbs.

At least five people have died

Despite the fact that moving from one district to another was hard, a witness reported demonstrators in the capital’s south. Hundreds of people gathered in Omdurman. They shouted, among other things, “No to military power.” At least five protestors were murdered, according to a doctor’s group allied to pro-democracy activists. “Bullets have harmed several people in Khartoum’s different areas,” it claimed.

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhane, who took control, reestablished the Sovereignty Council on Thursday, which oversaw the nation during the transition phase when tyrant Omar al-Bashir was deposed in 2019. Under pressure from the crowds, the military deposed Bashir.

Since the coup, fifteen individuals have been murdered in the crackdown on protesters. Doctors estimate that at than 300 people were hurt. Hundreds of opponents and militants have been detained, according to unions and other pro-democracy groups.

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